The Laws of Chess (1931)

Edward Winter



‘At last ... there is a standard book of rules which is effective all the world over’ (BCM, October 1931, page 446).

The text below, which comes from pages 245-283 (odd-numbered pages only) of the British Chess Federation Year Book, 1951-1952 (London, 1952), includes annotations by John Thomson Boyd (1878-1962), who was then a Vice-President of the Federation.


laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

laws of chess

Select bibliography on the drafting and translation of the rules:

The full unannotated text can be found, under the heading ‘International Chess Code’, on pages 207-224 of Chess for Fun & Chess for Blood by Edward Lasker (Philadelphia, 1942).



From page 47 of the February 1932 BCM:

‘The new law of the International Code against draws by mutual agreement before 30 moves have been made by Black was invoked once, a score of a drawn game being brought up and refused when only 23 moves had been made.’

A problem composed to highlight a perceived flaw in the laws (regarding castling) was given in C.N. 9299.



Latest update: 1 June 2015.

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Copyright: Edward Winter. All rights reserved.